Posts Tagged ‘Vermilion Cliffs’

Trying out QoR Lift Aid

Friday, November 1st, 2019

Having decided to focus on watercolors for the time being, I’ve narrowed down my watercolor paints primarily to two brands—Winsor-Newton Professional and Golden’s QoR Modern.

I love the QoR colors for use in my studio work because of their vibrancy and strength, with minimal fading as the paint dries.  The downside of this is that these paints tend to stain the paper considerably more than the Winsor-Newton paints do, so they are very difficult to lift off the paper to adjust values after the initial application has been applied.

On the other hand, I use Winsor-Newton paints mostly for teaching purposes because of the consistently high quality throughout the line, and the pricing and availability that make it feasible for beginners to buy.  I also use it in my travel kit because I can apply it quickly, with minimal fuss, and no concern about washing on overly strong colors in my sketchbook when I just want a subtle reminder of color – a potential problem with QoR.

Fortunately, I discovered recently that Golden has introduced a Lift Aid medium for their QoR watercolors.  Could it really help me lighten areas of my paintings?  How well would it work?  Would applying it mean I wouldn’t have to tape off the edges of my paper to ensure a clean border, but merely sweep my brush around the outside to clean up the overlaps?  And would it require any special application technique, as frisket does?  I decided to put it to the test. 

I began by applying a single layer of Lift Aid to four different brands of standard, cold-press watercolor paper—Arches, Strathmore (series 400), Fabriano, and Joe Miller’s Kilimanjaro—and allowing it to dry.

Using colors in the QoR line—both typically “staining” and “non-staining” colors—I applied several stripes of color to each of the papers.  On all except the Arches paper, I used both treated and untreated paper to illustrate the difference between using the Lift Aid and not using it.  The QoR colors I used were quinacridone gold, burnt sienna, permanent red, dioxazine purple, cobalt blue, indigo, and hookers green.

In lifting the color, the first attempt was made by dampening and blotting or wiping to lightly lift a little color (though this method often removed more than “a little”).  The second attempt was made by scrubbing to remove as much of the remaining color as possible.

QoR-Lift-Aid-TestThe Kilimanjaro paper showed minimal difference in lifting, whether the Lift Aid had been applied or not; only the (typically non-staining) cobalt blue lifted out to any great extent.  The surface of the Fabriano and Strathmore papers “pilled” (balled up) with scrubbing on the untreated side, damaging the surface, and to a lesser degree on the treated side of both.  The Lift Aid was most effective on the Arches surface, allowing every color to lift with the least difficulty, and almost entirely, with little or no damage when scrubbed.  Runners-up were clearly the Strathmore Series 400 and Fabriano, … if you don’t need to scrub back to near-white.

It is evident that the paper used is critical.  There was a considerable difference in the lifting ability on the various papers.  Apparently, the Lift Aid works in conjunction with the existing sizing (applied on the surface or incorporated into the paper by the manufacturer) to help seal the surface, minimizing how deeply the pigments can penetrate the paper.  The Lift Aid might be more effective on some of these papers if more than a single coat were applied before painting.

"Vermilion Cliffs," by Charlotte Mertz (8"x10" watercolor, #191005w)

“Vermilion Cliffs,” by Charlotte Mertz (8″x10″ watercolor, #191005w)

Here is a completed painting, for which I pre-treated portions of the Arches paper with Lift Aid.  I have been finding the Lift Aid a considerable help in adjusting the values and achieving the subtlety of colors needed for my recent compositions.  I wouldn’t trust even a pretreated paper, though, to allow me to entirely clean up the border edges, so I’ve still been taping off the desired dimensions for most of my recent studio compositions.  It’s important to keep in mind that it does not do the same job as frisket in reserving the original white of the paper.  It simply makes it easier to reduce the amount of pigment left on the paper.

I also feel a need to immediately rinse and then thoroughly wash the brush I have used to apply the Lift Aid so it doesn’t become compromised with the dried medium.

Would I recommend Lift Aid?  Absolutely, if you love the strong QoR colors but want the option of lifting some of the color after the original application.  Just test it yourself on your chosen paper before undertaking a critical composition.