Posts Tagged ‘travel experiences’

An air plein trip-up to remember

Saturday, September 1st, 2018

One logistical issue I hadn’t considered when taking a plein air trip was brought to my attention quite suddenly this summer.  Although I had gone light, with only a small shoulder bag painting kit and a folding stool in lieu of an easel, on the return trip I decided to tuck my art gear and the small watercolor paintings I’d completed into my suitcase and keep my backpack available for comfort items I’d need while flying back home.  After a six-hour flight delay (plus the two extra hours I’d allowed before flight time) and missing my original connecting flight, I managed to get standby space on a later connecting flight home.  But my suitcase didn’t.

Fortunately, I had both more art supplies and clothing at my destination.  But I didn’t have the new paintings I wanted to blog about.  Nor had I yet made a photographic record of all of them.  The suitcase did not appear on any of the next several flights, so I began to worry that they might have been “permanently lost” or routed back to my other address rather than to the location where I would be for the next several weeks … and where I would need everything else in the bag as well as the art!

I should have learned my lesson the only other time I’d been separated from my luggage, which, that time, had held my wedding dress.  Apparently a panicky bride carries more weight than an artist at the end of a long day of multiple airline snafus.  The wedding gown had been delivered by taxi the following day.  This time, the suitcase with my paintings, art supplies, and clothing did eventually arrive, but not nearly as promptly.

Lesson learned:  Find a way to keep the critical stuff with you!

Happy New Year!

Friday, January 1st, 2016

As a New Year gift to my followers, I have decided to begin a newsletter, called “Around and About,” about art (not only my own) and the journeys and experiences that lead the way.  Through it, I intend to keep you posted on my recent work, give you a peek into what goes on behind the scenes, and share some of my art insights and travel experiences with you. I may even include some critiques to share my thoughts regarding artistic design.  You can expect to see a new issue every 2-4 weeks. If you’re interested, be sure to subscribe to receive “Around and About.”  You can cancel at any time.

Here is a critique I wrote recently regarding a portrait of the Russian painter Konstantin Korovin, by Valentin Serov:

Serov,-Korovin

“Korovin” is an example of impressionistic portraiture, relying more heavily on suggestion than on precise detail. The artistic concept appears to be to portray the subject’s relaxed and contemplative repose.

Serov suggests repose by the downward angle of the subject’s body, the horizontal stripes of the bolster pillow, and the extended horizontal lines of the subject’s book (at his right shoulder) and his left shoulder and of the paintings on the wall. That the face is intended as the primary focal point is indicated by its being the most carefully detailed element of the composition and by being isolated at a “sweet spot,” approximately 1/3 of the distance from the top and left edges, almost entirely encircled by the light wall and shirt collar.

Though the shapes of the hands are only suggested, they too are in sweet spots, roughly 1/3 from the side and bottom edges. The fact that the right hand lies against the colorful stripes in an otherwise almost colorless room suggests that the artist’s painting hand lends color to his life. The significance of this hand is reinforced by the directing lines of the shirt collar, the white sleeve, the line of the pant leg, and the converging stripes behind the hand. The left sleeve and hand act as a balance to it, lying relaxed against the dark clothing and softening through lost and found edges into the gray wall behind.

Serov has maintained a sense of unity throughout the painting by using a limited palette, linking dark areas, and repeating reddish color spots in key areas—the face, wrist, wooden footboard, and covering of the daybed, and the bolster–which balance the otherwise dominantly cool composition. He has also used spotting (particularly with whites) to keep the light/dark patterns of the notan design interesting. Upon closer inspection, we can see that Serov has provided additional visual interest in the directional strokes on the wall and bolster cushion, and in textural brushwork throughout.

 

If there’s anything you’d particularly like to know about regarding materials, techniques, design principles, or my own working methods, drop me a line and let me know. I’d love to hear from you and will try to respond.  Or if you would like me to include a (gentle) critique of your own work, with comments about what succeeds and (if needed) how it might be strengthened, feel free to email me a clear picture of it, along with your name, the title, medium, and dimensions, and I’ll consider featuring it in the newsletter.