Posts Tagged ‘Still Life’

Cultivating Inspiration

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

As I indicated in my previous blogs, I find inspiration for my work in a variety of ways. Sometimes from other artists’ work, sometimes from places I go, and sometimes from epiphanies that come from … well, who knows where?

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I’ve found that still life setups work best when they follow a theme, when the elements are unified in some way, whether through color, shape, purpose, or some other commonality. With that in mind, I began collecting groups of items that I thought might work well together or lend themselves to multiple themed setups.

In this original setup, in which I selected Japanese dining elements to unify it, I wanted to use a secondary fish theme, reflected not only in the motif in the china but in the quilt backdrop and in the woven decoration.

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Early stages are the time to determine whether incidental background lines or textures may be distracting and what needs to be done about them. That’s also when I consider balance of form and value and color. And I continually ask myself if the setup is saying what I want it to. In the process, it’s important to allow the original theme or concept to evolve as I recognize thematic clutter or as more ideas occur to me. Not all changes need to be made with the physical elements within the setup; some can be incorporated during the painting process. But the closer the setup can be made to approximate the desired result, the easier it will be to work from.

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Perhaps surprisingly, it’s often more difficult to decide what to omit from a setup than what to include. A certain element may support the theme, and it may be a favorite item for any of a number of reasons, so it seems like a shoo-in to incorporate. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that its inclusion enhances the still life. It may even detract from the overall design. In that case, it should be removed. Unfortunately, that determination is not always an easy one to make.

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So I prepare a setup, adjust the backdrop, rearrange the elements, substitute one element for another, and consider endless alternatives. This work alone can continue for a long time before I ever pick up a pencil to begin sketching the design.

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And even then, I may continue to revise its “reality” both as I prepare the drawing and throughout the painting process.

Meanwhile, I’ve been taking mental note of alternative setups suggested by the elements rejected for use in the one currently under construction. These elements may be used later in totally different compositions.

So where do ideas come from? Not just from the garden right outside the window or from exotic travels. I find them also on my studio shelves, in my kitchen pantry, a child’s toy chest, amid sewing supplies, and jumbled in unearthed storage boxes. Anything may plant the seed of an idea. Over time that seed may begin to germinate. And with a bit of care and cultivation, it may eventually grow into something of note.

Rainy-Day Compensation

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

Last time I wrote about having to forego painting plein air landscapes from the open deck of our river ship. Even before we had to substitute coach travel for the more comfortable and leisurely vessel, rain was still a factor with which we were forced to contend. So not all the sketches I painted on what I’ve come to think of as the “Surf and Turf Cruise” this spring were of passing scenery.

One rainy day I snuggled into a cozy chair and studied one of the lovely flower arrangements that graced the almost deserted lounge. I didn’t recognize what variety of blossom was used, but I enjoyed the form and the delicate color, and I’m glad I was able to capture its graceful drape out of the upstanding foliage.

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I allowed the delicate pinks of the blossom to flow wet in wet across the surface of each petal. Negative painting allowed me to shape the leaves around the pale lines of the heavy veins. And I chose to leave the background undeveloped, allowing the simple, single stem and flower to say everything that was needed to illustrate and remind me of the entire decorative arrangement.

If anyone recognizes what type of flower this is, I’d love to hear from you.