Posts Tagged ‘painting on location’

En Plein Air — Pros and Cons

Friday, June 1st, 2018

I’ve been focusing on plein air the second quarter of this year.  But I know that plein air painting is not for everyone; nor is it the best option for all situations.   So, in case some of my readers are thinking about trying it, in this article I thought it might be good to enumerate some of the pros and cons of painting outdoors, as compared with working in a studio setting.

Whereas it’s lovely to work outdoors in beautiful, sunny weather (PRO), it’s safe to say that none of us live in an area that is comfortable all the time.  At one time or another, we all face uncomfortable environmental factors, which can feel exaggerated when we’re painting outdoors (CON).  Heat, cold, wind, precipitation, blowing dust or sand, dripping trees, and a variety of insect life can easily put a lid on an otherwise pleasurable outing or threaten the integrity of our work.  In cold weather, paint stiffens, water freezes, and our fingers, toes, and ears go numb.  In warmer weather, we may more likely be affected by sudden showers, wind gusts that can topple an easel, and insects that bombard us and become embedded in our work.  Yet, where else but outdoors do we have the opportunity to observe so closely or so directly the colors of our immediate environment under natural lighting conditions (PRO)?

Whereas a studio can provide both controlled climatic conditions, as well as controllable lighting conditions, the sun is a continuously moving light source, and scudding clouds can exacerbate the problem of rapidly changing shadow patterns (CON).  So wise painters discipline themselves (PRO) to preplan and follow compositional studies carefully to avoid “chasing the light” as the light-and-shadow patterns shift.

And although studio work, based on previously painted studies or photographs, can provide a broad choice of preselected views from a wide range of locations, working on site, en plein air, gives us flexibility to choose specific views, from an almost unlimited variety of angles, and both size and dimensions of the compositional field within the available locale (PRO).  We are also unconsciously more inclined to integrate non-visual sensual impressions from our environment into our work (PRO).  And although we cannot control the immediate climatic or lighting conditions within our locale (CON), painting on location does provide incentive to explore the same scene in a variety of lighting and atmospheric conditions (PRO) without limiting ourselves to some expected, idealized view.

Breaking away from studio reference photos also frees us to view an area in ways we haven’t previously considered and to interpret it “with new eyes”.  It gives us incentive to seek beauty even in the seemingly mundane or in elements of life that others might even consider ugly.  It stretches us spiritually, emotionally, and intellectually, and opens our hearts to quite literally see the world differently (PRO).

Working outdoors usually tends to limit our actual painting time (CON).  Both transporting and protecting our equipment and materials both enroute to the painting site and for our return takes time from our actual painting activity.  But, although we may feel pressured to work too quickly to produce our best work (CON), it does motivate us to work efficiently, from selecting our materials to transport, through preplanning our compositions, to executing the painting itself (PRO).

Passersby can further limit our time by stopping to talk with us and by offering “critiques” (sought or not) of the work in progress (CON).  But these same interruptions provide visibility and an opportunity to both gauge the public’s response to our work and to engage them in it to better understand it and appreciate our painting process (PRO).  It may even occasionally result in a sale (PRO).

And as well as engaging with the public, working en plein air, which is often done in a group with other painters, gives us the opportunity to exchange ideas with other like-minded artists, to share ideas, information, seek out knowledgeable feedback, and to build lasting friendships (PRO).

All artists should weigh these pros and cons to decide whether the plein-air option would be right for them.  If nothing else, it’s a refreshing excuse to get out into the world.