Intuition and Preplanning

While pointing out to my class how certain design principles are exemplified in master paintings, one of my students asked if the artists had actually thought about all of these principles as they planned the paintings.

I assured her that, although an artist will think consciously about certain aspects of a composition, so many of the principles will have become ingrained through experience that the design principles will have become second nature—an extension of the artists intuitive aesthetic sense.

Do we consciously plan the location of the focal point?  Perhaps.  But just as likely is that, we place it because a specific location appeals to our intuitive aesthetic.  It looks right, and feels right to us.  Similarly, a sense of tension and dynamic balance is often initially based on a “gut feel” at least as much as on conscious planning, although taking time to evaluate a painting in progress will often reveal to us how we may consciously improve the effect.

Yes, we consciously select our palette colors, but our experience with having used these colors in the past informs our decision about which specific paints to use with which others.  We have learned which pairings work effectively together to create the effects we want, so we don’t become bogged down in selecting which of our many options we will use from each hue family.

We often hear people say, “I don’t know much about art, but I know what I like.”  They are speaking of their intuitive aesthetic—innate but uninformed preferences.

As we learn more about the principles of artistic design, we begin to learn why we find certainly features preferable.  And this, in turn, allows us to incorporate those principles into our work to increase its effectiveness and appeal.

Most of us, especially so-called “self-taught” artists, frequently glean information and ideas from many other artists—both contemporaries and those who have preceded us.  But the chances are that we may miss (or misconstrue) many of the principles that could be helpful to us.  Whether we have a formal art education or have learned from various sources over time, it is in our best interest to continue learning as much as possible in relation to our artistic pursuits.

As we gain both understanding and experience, our intuition gradually gives way to subconscious decision-making based on our experience and informed options.  Yes, we initially make some conscious decisions about the painting’s purpose, materials, size, and palette.  We consciously plan a design and approach.  But once the initial planning stage is complete, it frees us to get into “the zone,” in which we make fewer conscious decisions and allow our subconscious intuition direct most of our remaining choices.

You can find a concise overview of many of the principles of artistic composition, in my ebook Elements of Great Composition: A Quick Reference for Photographers and Other Visual Artists.

Elements of Great Composition

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