En Plein Air – Follow-up

August 15th, 2018

Besides learning techniques for painting outdoors, my recent plein air experiences have alerted me to some of the logistical issues, as well.

Early lessons learned included the need for proper equipment.  In Key West my backpack carried the easel and all my other paraphernalia, but it was slightly too small to allow me to zip the main pocket fully around the easel and shelf.  I used a bungee cord to hold it all together.  And though the tripod fitted into the side pocket and was anchored with straps up the height of the backpack, its length was unwieldy.  The pack also had so many pockets that I actually couldn’t access my camera, which had slipped down to the bottom of an inside pocket.  As a result, I wound up using my phone camera instead, from which it was more difficult to transfer images to my computer, as well as providing poorer quality images that were difficult to see on the small screen in bright sunlight.  Upon our return, I promptly ordered a Plein Air Pro backpack designed specifically to encompass my entire Plein Air Pro easel kit and tripod.

As I had long suspected, experience also confirmed that I needed to find a good painting umbrella both to protect me from the direct Florida sun (which makes temperatures seem noticeably and uncomfortably hotter than actual temperatures in the shade) and to protect my eyes, which tend to lose an accurate sense of color in high glare.  So that was another purchase I made this summer.  The model I chose is the EASyL Plein Air Umbrella, which is comparatively lightweight, forgiving of windy conditions, and fits, as the tripod had on my Key West trip, into an outside pocket of my new backpack, bound up the length with support straps.  Both the easel and the umbrella fit into a large, checkable suitcase but not into carry-on sized luggage.

I also picked up a small folding stool to have along in the car when I use with my pocket watercolor kit but when I don’t want to take a full easel setup.

And of course, techniques and equipment are only part of the equation.  As you have probably already seen in recent posts, time, energy level, and prioritization also play important roles.  We have to actually get ourselves out there to paint!  We can’t get out of our efforts what we don’t put into them.

 

En Plein Air – Composition

August 1st, 2018

I’ve been having some fun this past month playing with less common aspect ratios for my compositions.

As I considered this live-oak tree, for instance, with its resident bromeliad, fluffy tufts of air plants, moss, and multi-colored patches of lichen, I chose an elongated vertical composition (10” x 5”) to emphasize the height of the trunk, allowing the contrasting lines of the branches and the bromeliad blossoms to visually counter-balance the dominant vertical thrust, and the mass of the bromeliad to counter the lines and puff-points in the rest of the composition.

"Arboreal Tenants" by Charlotte Mertz (10"x5" watercolor, #180701w)

“Arboreal Tenants” by Charlotte Mertz
(10″ x 5″ watercolor, #180701w)

In order to feature the other plants that have nestled into the vertically textured bark, I took the artistic liberty of drastically minimizing–to a wash of merely suggested color–the densely wooded background and entirely eliminating the tree’s own foliage, both of which would have created visual confusion.

This process of visual simplification also narrowed my own focus down to the key elements, which can be very helpful when working en plein air, where it’s easy to become distracted by other, extraneous aspects of the environment.

Door County Community Mosaic Project

July 15th, 2018

Although I am unable to be in Door County, Wisconsin, for their annual Plein Air Festival, July 22-28, this year, I am happy to have been able to participate in the Community Mosaic Project, to which artists of all ages and inclinations are encouraged to contribute in support of the Hardy Gallery, a Door County charity.  The “mosaic” will be on display July 20 through August 26, 2018, concurrently with the popular Collection Invitational Exhibition, at the Hardy Gallery in Ephraim, Wisconsin.

"Well Rooted" by Charlotte Mertz (6"x6" acrylic on canvas, #180601a)

“Well Rooted” by Charlotte Mertz (6″x6″ acrylic on canvas, #180601a)

Entitled “Well Rooted,” my painting (numbered 118 for the exhibit) was inspired by the intertwined roots at the base of a stand of trees in a shaded park.  They reminded me of the residents of this sylvan area, who anchor, support, and strengthen one another through the vagaries of time, weather, and … well, life in general.

If you’re in the vicinity, I hope you’ll stop in and show your support for this very active and attractive arts community.

 

En Plein Air – Quick-Sketch Tips for Watercolor

July 1st, 2018

When doing very quick watercolor sketches en plein air I find that it helps to keep the sketches small, use a limited palette, and lightly sketch out a simple composition in pencil before I ever begin painting.  This is particularly true when planning to do more than simple studies with pen and a loose wash.

"Sister Bay Marina Light" by Charlotte Mertz (4"x6" watercolor, #180605w)

“Sister Bay Marina Light” by Charlotte Mertz
(4″x6″ watercolor, #180605w)

In this simplified sketch of the marina light in Sister Bay, Wisconsin, I also simplified the palette, using only two blues (cobalt and indigo), two reds (scarlet lake and brown madder), burnt umber, lemon yellow, and permanent sap green.  It could have been simplified even further, but I like to work with warm and cool versions of the primaries.

Rather than using frisket to reserve white, when working this small, I often simply paint around areas I want reserved as white, such as the sunlit portions of the marina light and the masts on the far side of the harbor.

The quality of my sketches usually improves as I continue to paint more pieces in the same outing.  There are several reasons for this:

1) First, I am usually over-eager to begin actually painting, so don’t always take time for accurate drawing to undergird my initial watercolor sketch.  However, the longer I work, the more relaxed I become, the less pressure I put on myself to work fast, and the more accurate the drawing tends to be.

2) Working as quickly as I am inclined to (particularly at first), my wet colors often bleed and shadow areas have a tendency to lose definition,  If I can stay on location long enough to allow the paint to dry sufficiently, I can retouch the darker areas to compensate for the loss of definition or any value lost in the drying process.  But this is not always possible when working quickly on location due to legitimate time constraints, such as encroaching weather.

3) The earliest sketches help me determine how quickly (or slowly) the paint will dry in the pervading atmosphere, allowing me to judge and apply color values more accurately in subsequent sketches.

4) When pan paints (or tube paints that I have allowed to dry in the palette) are first used, they tend to release fewer pigments into the water, but as they soften with use,  they release their pigments more readily.  This affects the proportion of pigment to water, ensuring application of stronger colors in later paintings than in the initial efforts.

So for several reasons, it’s often advisable to take time to do a few warm-up sketches before tackling the more important scenes.

Plein Air Priorities

June 15th, 2018

I had hoped, in touring some of the western National Parks this past May, to do some plein air painting along the way.  However, as I had found in the past, guided sightseeing tours do not provide many opportunities for full-fledged painting setups, and by the time we got settled into our hotel rooms at the end of each day’s excursions, I was too tired to head out on my own.  (Yes, I know that many would say that if I were a true die-hard, I would venture out to capture the sunset or some iconic view of the locale.  More power to those who can!  But at my age, I’ve learned to be realistic about my physical stamina and need for adequate rest.)

“Grand Tetons” by Charlotte Mertz (4″x6″ watercolor, #180510w)

Although I was able to do a very small, quick watercolor in the Tetons while the rest of the group watched an informative film, most of my output was in the form of even quicker pencil sketches, for which minimal setup and time were required.  Sometimes I could snatch a moment during a lunch break.  At other times, while waiting for the bus to get underway, I would sketch the scenery directly from my coach seat.

"Jackson Hillside" by Charlotte Mertz  (#180509p)

“Jackson Hillside” by Charlotte Mertz
(#180509p)

Would I discourage others from taking sightseeing tours?  Definitely not!  And here’s why.  I was able to accrue innumerable reference photos during our travels, saw sights I probably would not have seen, and learned information I probably would have missed if I had been traveling on my own.

And the short sketching stints encouraged me to look for the essence, such as the overall silhouette shapes, intertwining textures, and interplay of values within this stand of firs.

"Yellowstone Firs" by Charlotte Mertz  (#180512p)

“Yellowstone Firs” by Charlotte Mertz
(#180512p)

However, I would recommend, for anyone who wants to spend considerable time painting, that you establish your own schedule and priorities.  Arrange travel time around your painting time, rather than trying to squeeze the painting into a pre-scheduled tour itinerary.  If you want a tour, look for someone local who can fit a bit of sightseeing into your painting schedule, preferably one who can provide guidance to promising painting sites, as well as offer insights into regional lore.